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Fish and seafood: for a BBQ with a difference

Have you ever tried sea bream fresh from the barbecue? Or salmon skewers with courgette? Or maybe even octopus? These dishes need a little bit of care and attention in the preparation – but with our recipes and a few tips, you can create some true delights! We show you the perfect tools and reveal how to use them in order to bring that holiday vibe to your plate.

Accessories are key: here's what you need for perfectly barbecued fish and seafood

With the right tools, this ultimate treat will be even tastier. Of course you can simply place the fish on the grill and wait for it to cook. But you can also put trout, sea bream etc. in stylish fish grilling baskets and simply turn the whole thing. Then nothing will stick to the grill, and turning them over is easy-peasy. Another option is a grill tray, which is particularly great for cooking seafood to perfection on your home barbecue.

Tips: how to make a success of barbecued fish and seafood

For the perfect barbecued fish and seafood, having the right equipment is important – but how you go about cooking it is crucial. From buying the best ingredients and skilful handling on the barbecue, to gauging the precise cooking time for each speciality; there are lots of things to bear in mind.
To help, we have put together a few tips on the best way to prepare and cook fish and seafood.
The higher the fat content, the better
Lean fish can also be put on the barbecue, but it is easier to prepare if the fish has a high fat content. Salmon, herring, mackerel and eel, for example, are particularly suitable. As a general rule, the larger or thicker the piece, the easier it is.
Directly onto the barbecue or not?
Large, whole fish can be placed directly onto the barbecue. Small fish with a low fat content that break up easily should preferably be prepared in aluminium foil or in an aluminium tray. If you don't trust the barbecue, but would rather not use foil, you can wrap the fish in a cabbage leaf, for example, or grill it on a bed of lemon and orange slices.
That way, nothing sticks
Whether on the barbecue or in foil, though, one rule always applies: apply ample fat! Before the fish goes on the barbecue, the base should be brushed with oil. That way, the grilled items will not stick when turned.
With or without the shell?
Since fish and seafood quickly dry out on the barbecue, their scales and shells are the chef’s best friends. Fish fillets with skin on are good when cooked on the barbecue – those without are more of a case for aluminium foil. Likewise, shellfish such as lobster and prawns should always be grilled in their shell.
Not all bivalves are the same
Only in the case of bivalves is the shell not automatically a winner: scallops go on the barbecue without their shell, while oysters have just half of their shell removed. The water is retained – the bivalve cooks in it. In the case of mussels, the shell stays on.
Keep it short and sweet: cooking times
Fish and seafood need only a short time on the grill, as they very quickly dry out. This goes especially for items without any skin or shell. Too much heat is not good for them either, which is why they are better off on the indirect part of the grill or on a higher shelf.
How long exactly?
A whole fish or a whole lobster needs a good 20 minutes. Most bivalves are ready to eat after no more than six minutes. Prawns can be served after about five minutes and salmon steaks after roughly nine minutes.
Do not turn too often
Initially, fish and many seafoods always stick to the barbecue. Later on too, the sea creatures could fall apart or land in the embers when turned. Therefore, it is best to leave them to sit and only turn them for the first and last time about 70 percent of the way through the cooking time. If a piece of fish has skin on, this side goes on the barbecue first.

More things to know about barbecuing: Meat | Sausage | Vegetarian | Cooking times | Drinks