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All about Champagne

Do you know the main differences between Champagne, Prosecco, Cava etc.? Learn useful information about Champagne, discover recipes for zingy cocktails and get to know more about vintners and Champagne regions. We've put together all you need to know about this exquisite sparkling wine.

Useful information: what to bear in mind when handling Champagne?

Champagne is a sparkling wine from the Champagne region, located to the north-east of Paris. No other wine is as popular for marking a special occasion as Champagne. Once purchased, these wines can be stored for a further two to three years. Vintage Champagnes are often at their best having aged up to ten years.
Good Champagne should not be served cold but rather at a temperature of 10-12 degrees, otherwise the aromas are lost. When opening a bottle, the cork must be removed carefully as a popped cork can cause injury and result in a loss of fine wine. Champagne glasses and glasses for other wines should be narrower at the top so that the aromas are channelled towards the nose. Long glasses are preferred as the perlage is more visible. Champagne is not only suitable as an aperitif but also as an accompaniment to a full meal.
Champagne corks
In contrast to most other corks, champagne corks have two parts. For cost reasons, the upper part is made of ground cork, while two discs of high-quality natural cork are glued to the bottom.
The wine only comes into contact with the natural cork, which stops it from losing its fizz. When they are made, champagne corks are cylindrical. They only take on their mushroom-like shape as the cork is not fully inserted into the bottle, instead being additionally attached to the bottle with a special wire cage known as a muselet. When a bottle of champagne is opened, the moist, lower part of the cork expands again, while the more brittle part in the upper bottleneck remains compacted. The word "champagne" is scorched onto the bottom of a champagne cork, along with the vintage for vintage champagnes.
Sparkling wines: sweet and dry
Many sparkling wines are not totally dry, which means they still contain sugar. The sugar is added in liquid form to the bottle before it is sealed.
The sugar content is indicated indirectly with a term such as 'brut' on the label of the bottle. A 'brut' Champagne must, by law, contain 0-15 g of sugar per litre, and 7-12 g per litre is the average. The best Champagnes are 'brut' or even 'extra brut' with 0-6 g of sugar per litre. In the case of Prosecco, however, the best are 'dry' if they have 17-32 g of sugar per litre. Depending on its origin, therefore, a good bubbly can be sweet or dry.
The quality of the bubbles in sparkling wine
The quality of the bubbles or carbonation in sparkling wine says a lot about the wine's quality. Determining the quality of the carbonation involves looking at how long the carbonation remains in the wine and how big the bubbles are.
Sparkling wine that has been infused with carbon dioxide, i.e. where the carbonation was pressed into the still liquid, as with soft drinks, has large bubbles, which disappear soon after the wine is opened. If the carbon dioxide is formed during alcoholic fermentation in a pressure tank, such as with Prosecco or Moscato, the bubbles are smaller and last longer. Fermenting the sparkling wine in the bottle for a second time and then storing it in the bottle, as is the case with Cava or Champagne, produces the finest bubbles which last longest. Since aromas are released in the carbonation bubbles in particular, a wine with much smaller and longer-lasting bubbles is aromatic and of high quality.
Prosecco: an enduring trend
Time and again, Italian wines manage to delight wine lovers. Prosecco is a great example.
This sparkling wine from the province of Veneto was still relatively unknown fifteen years ago and only well represented on a few markets. Ever since then it has enjoyed a steady rise in popularity. With a light body, refreshing citrus aromas, subtle residual sweetness and a reasonable price tag, Prosecco gained fans around the world in no time. In 2013, Prosecco sales outnumbered Champagne for the first time. To quench the persistent thirst for Prosecco, 307 million bottles were sold, compared to 304 million bottles of Champagne. To ensure the wine retained its quality despite booming demand, the name ‘Prosecco’ was protected under a new DOC regulation in July 2009.

Champagne cocktails: a summer must-have

Enjoy the summer with the Moët Ice & Moët Ice Rosé Champagne, created especially to be drunk over ice. A new, fun take on Champagne that is refreshing and enjoyable, and the perfect drink on warm days.

Moët Ruby Cooler

Ingredients:

  • 40 ml Moët & Chandon Ice Impérial
  • 5 ml lemon juice
  • 5 ml grapefruit juice
  • 10 ml soda water
  • 1 tsp sugar syrup
  • 1 tsp Campari
  • 4 basil leaves
Pour the lemon juice, grapefruit juice and soda water into a large wine glass. Add the basil leaves, syrup and Campari. Next, add a few ice cubes and the Moët & Chandon Ice Impérial. Carefully stir the cocktail, garnish, and serve.
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75cl

Champagne AOC Ice Impérial Moët & Chandon

France

Average rating: 5.0 of 5 16 ratings

Moët & Chandon Ice Impérial ist der erste Champagner, der auf Eis serviert wird. Moët & Chandons Chefkellermeister Benoît Gouez, der diesen Eis-Champagner komponiert hat, beschreibt die Innovation folgendermassen: Zum ersten Mal wurde ein Champagner komponiert, der speziell für den Genuss auf Eis bestimmt ist. Er ist das perfekte Getränk für ganz spontane Feiern mit Freunden an warmen Sommertagen.

Price
16%

49.95

was 59.95

Price per 10 Centiliter
6.66/10cl

Other ingredients:

Moët Mint 75

Ingredients:

  • 40 ml Moët & Chandon Ice Impérial OR Moët & Chandon Ice Impérial Rosé
  • 7.5 ml lemon juice
  • 5 ml sugar syrup
  • 10 ml Belvedere vodka
  • 3 raspberries
  • 6 mint leaves
Pour all the ingredients except the Champagne into a large wine glass. Next, add the raspberries and a few ice cubes, then carefully pour over the Moët Ice Impérial (Rosé). Carefully stir the cocktail, garnish, and serve.
Enlarged picture Close
75cl

Champagne AOC Ice Impérial Rosé Moët & Chandon

France

Average rating: 5.0 of 5 5 ratings

Moët & Chandon Ice Impérial ist der erste Champagner, der auf Eis serviert wird. Moët & Chandons Chefkellermeister Benoît Gouez, der diesen Eis-Champagner komponiert hat, beschreibt die Innovation folgendermassen: Zum ersten Mal wurde ein Champagner komponiert, der speziell für den Genuss auf Eis bestimmt ist. Er ist das perfekte Getränk für ganz spontane Feiern mit Freunden an warmen Sommertagen.

Price
14%

57.95

was 67.95

Price per 10 Centiliter
7.73/10cl

Other ingredients:

Origin: Countries, vintners and regions

Learn the origin of our Champagnes and sparkling wines. Find out more about the vintners and wineries as well as the growing areas and grape varieties.